BBH 143: Drugs, Behavior, and Health

  • College: College of Health and Human Development
  • Department: Department of Biobehavioral Health
  • Credits: 3
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Health aspects of use and abuse of licit and illicit drugs; related social problems and prevention. Designed for non-BBH majors. BBH 143 Drugs, Behavior, and Health (3) (GHA) This course is designed for non-BBH majors who want a fundamental understanding of health and social issues relating to drug and alcohol use and abuse. This course should help students in the biological and behavioral sciences better understand practical applications of theoretical knowledge relating to drug physiology, drug-related health effects, health promotion and disease prevention, issues related to social and psychological effects of drug use and abuse, and drug control policies. The course will cover a broad array of drugs including licit drugs (e.g., therapeutic drugs, tobacco, caffeine, alcohol, etc.), and illicit drugs (amphetamines, marijuana, hallucinogens, etc.) with additional focus on drugs liable for addiction and the progression from occasional use to addiction. The course will cover the basics of drug pharmacology, including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Special attention will be given to toxicology and addiction physiology. The course is broad in scope, covering subjects such as alcohol and drug use and misuse in specific populations (youth college students, etc.), toxicity and threatsto children and adults posed by common therapeutic drugs (aspirin, prescription drugs, etc.), and prevention and treatment strategies for overdoses (e.g., emergency treatment, use of poison control centers, etc.). The course will involve student and faculty discussion of laws concerning the manufacture, distribution and use of drugs, including alcohol and tobacco, and drug development. Students will engage in activities to learn the most efficacious strategies for prevention, intervention and treatment for drug-misuse-related disorders, including community-based programs to pharmacological intervention, and detoxification. Students will engage in a number of activities that involve self-assessment of personal drug use and potential health trajectories. A significant portion of the course will involve accessing drug-related websites to complete specified exercises in data gathering, synthesis, and critical evaluation of issues relating to drug use and abuse and drug control. These exercises will involve both written reports and oral discussions and applications to contemporary society and community. Students will learn practical skills in being able to access a variety of sources to update knowledge about causality and treatment of addictions and to critically appraise these sources. Students intending to major in Biobehavioral Health should take BBH 451–Pharmacological Influences on Health.

BBH 203 (PSYCH 260): Neurological Bases of Human Behavior

  • College: College of the Liberal Arts
  • Department: Department of Psychology
  • Credits: 3
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An introduction to biopsychology, emphasizing the structure and function of the human brain. The nervous system provides the biological underpinning of behavior, and several scientific fields are concerned with the relationship between the nervous system and behavior. The goal of this course is to introduce the principle methods, findings, and theories of these scientific fields. Topics include (a) the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, (b) how the nervous system gives rise to perception, action, language, memory, emotion and reproductive behavior, and (c) how drugs and mental illnesses affect the nervous system and alter normal perceptual, cognitive, and emotional behavior. The course prepares students for a number of more advanced courses in Psychology and Biobehavioral Health that address specialized topics in neuroscience, and may satisfy a requirement of these majors.

BBH 451: Pharmacological Influences on Health

  • College: College of Health and Human Development
  • Department: Department of Biobehavioral Health
  • Credits: 3
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Biological and behavioral aspects of therapeutic and recreational drug use and misuse, and their relationships to health.

BBH 451 Pharmacological Influences on Health (3) The primary theme of this course is to review and integrate information relevant to the actions, uses, and biobehavioral influences of psychoactive drugs. Concepts relevant to pharmacology, biobehavioral health, and drug use and abuse will be learned. The primary objectives of this course are: 1. To provide an understanding of the concepts relevant to pharmacology, including: principles of drug action (pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics), drug safety, and drug effectiveness. 2. To provide a descriptive representation of the breadth of topics relating to behavioral and biological influences of psychoactive (i.e., therapeutic, recreational) drugs on human health and disease. 3. To provide exposure to and enhance critical thinking skills in current research related to the biobehavioral effects of psychoactive (i.e., therapeutic, recreational) drugs, including: psychoactive drug use and abuse, therapeutic drug use, and drug addiction treatments.

BBH 452: Women’s Health Issues

  • College: College of Health and Human Development
  • Department: Department of Biobehavioral Health
  • Credits: 3
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Examines major health issues concerning women today. The topics covered include, but are not limited to: developing a healthy life style–nutrition and exercise; family planning–birth control methods; violence against women–relationship rights and signs of a batterer; eating disorders–anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating; sexual wellness; substance abuse–alcohol, prescription drugs; menopause signs and symptoms, treatments; and medical conditions affecting women today such as cancer, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and heart disease. The course emphasizes that women’s lives are influenced by social, economic, political, and cultural conditions.

CNED 401: Foundations of Chemical Dependency Counseling

  • College: College of Education
  • Department: Department of Sociology and Criminology
  • Credits: 3
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An overview of diagnosis and assessment, models for chemical dependency prevention, counseling, and recovery; contexts of chemical dependency treatment.

CNED 416: Interpersonal Relationships and Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) Dependency

  • College: College of Education
  • Department: Counselor Education
  • Credits: 3
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This course examines families with chemically dependent members, dynamics, appropriate interventions, and treatment.

CNED 421: Counseling Strategies for Preventing Chemical Dependency

  • College: College of Education
  • Department: Counselor Education
  • Credits: 3
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Examines helping professionals’ role in primary and secondary prevention of substance abuse, and related problems like delinquency, suicide, and pregnancy.

CNED 422: Foundations of Addictions Counseling

  • College: College of Education
  • Department: Counselor Education
  • Credits: 3
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Study of the fundamental principles of counseling individuals with a wide variety of addictions. Students explore the fundamental principles of addictions counseling from a wide range of perspectives. These include the psychopharmacological aspects of alcohol and abusable drugs, along with theories and assessments of addictive disorders. Many treatment models are considered, and are examined in the context of individual, group, and family therapy perspectives. The course also addresses the research literature on codependence, COA’s AA and other 12-step programs, dual diagnosis, relapse, prevention, and multicultural and gender issues.

CNED 530: Family Counseling: Theory and Practice

  • College: College of Education
  • Department: Counselor Education
  • Credits: 3
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Conceptualization and application of family counseling frameworks to EC-12 school settings are learned in this course.

Family functioning is paramount in the educational, personal/social, and career development of children and adolescents. This course prepares school counselors and other counselors for helping children and adolescents in the context of family. Several theories and models of family counseling are presented, focusing on application of these frameworks to work in EC-12 schools. Through experiential activities connected to the course, counselor-trainees are encouraged to relate experiences in their own families to their functioning as counselors. The course is required for a master’s degree in elementary or secondary school counseling. Evaluation includes multiple-choice tests and a self-reflection project. The course objectives follow: Students will: 1. know the terminology and basic concepts associated with systems thinking and family counseling. 2. adopt a family systems frame of reference and understand the family counseling perspective. 3. know the history and development of family counseling. 4. conceptualize the social constructionist perspective of family counseling and human functioning, including perspectives on substance use and abuse, gender, lifestyle, socioeconomic conditions, sociopolitical conditions, relations among diverse groups, and culture and identity. 5. understand and apply various frameworks of family counseling to the school counseling and school context, including Bowenian theory, attachment theory, experiential/humanistic approaches, structural and strategic approaches, cognitive-behavioral approaches, solution-focused therapy, narrative therapy, and integrative models. 6. grow in their own self-awareness with regard to their families of origin. 7. understand the use of self in counseling and learn and apply this knowledge in experiential activities and personal and professional functioning. 8. understand the wounded healer concept and attachment theory implications for counselor functioning. 9. comprehend and delineate the relationships among family systems, schools, and community systems. 10. understand racial-ethnic, gender, cultural, socioeconomic, and lifestyle issues in the context of family, school, and community and institutional systems. 11. know how families, schools, and communities interact to influence students’ development. 12. understand strategies used to promote effective teamwork among counselors, educational professionals, students, parents, schools, and communities. 13. understand communication, collaboration, and consultation with parents, educational and mental health professionals, guardians, and community members for promoting students educational, career, and personal development. 14. know and understand the structure of parenting styles and outcomes associated with each parenting style. 15. understand research on parenting styles and contrast the traditional view of adolescent development with the contemporary view. 16. apply parenting styles for various prevention and intervention strategies. 17. know research support for various prevention and intervention strategies, understand measurement associated with various theories and models, and understand research traditions and methods associated with various theories and models.

CNED 840: Trends and Issues in Addiction Counseling

  • College: College of Education
  • Department: Counselor Education
  • Credits: 3
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This course provides an overview of current professional and ethical issues facing the addictions field.

CRIMJ 415: Drug Control Policy in Comparative Perspective

  • College: College of the Liberal Arts
  • Department: Department of Sociology and Criminology
  • Credits: 3
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Examines the history of drug control policy in the United States; comparisons and contrasts with other countries’ experiences. This course focuses on the history of drug control policy in the United States and the internationalization of drug prohibition. We also examine the experience of other countries with drug use, abuse and control, including alternative regulatory policies in Western Europe. This class is both historical and comparative in orientation: in tracing the roots of drug prohibition, and examining the experience of other countries, we seek to enrich our understanding of American style drug control and the feasibility of alternative approaches.

CRIMJ 424: Drugs, Crime, and Society

  • College: College of the Liberal Arts
  • Department: Department of Sociology and Criminology
  • Credits: 3
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Why do people take drugs? Why and how does society attempt to control drug use and distribution? What is the association between drugs and crime? Exploring questions such as these will be central in CRIM 429. The focus of this course will be examining explanations of drug use and the social construction of drug policies. We will begin by asking the question “What are drugs?” From there, we will discuss theories of drug abuse and the methods used to study patterns of drug use. We will also take an in-depth look at the histories, pharmacologies, and patterns associated with the most popular drugs in modern society. In the second half of the semester, we will focus on the social control of drugs and the connections between drugs and crime. At the heart of this discussion will be the causes and consequences of modern U.S. drug policies. We will conclude with a look at alternative drug policies and what the future may hold for drug use in America.Throughout the semester, you will be asked to think critically about material and evaluate its strengths and weaknesses. To foster critical thinking skills, you will have ample opportunities to discuss topics in class, analyze arguments in written assignments and in-class exercises, and apply ideas to real world situations through course projects and presentations.

CRIMJ 424W: Drugs and Crime

  • College: College of the Liberal Arts
  • Department: Department of Sociology and Criminology
  • Credits: 3
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Analysis of international narcotics trafficking in the twentieth century.

CRIMJ 469: Drugs and Drug Policy in the United States

  • College: College of the Liberal Arts
  • Department: Department of Sociology and Criminology
  • Credits: 3
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Examines the history and dimensions of drug use and analyzes the impact of drug policy. For nearly a century, the United States has been waging its version of a hundred years’ war on drugs, spending billions of dollars and incarcerating thousands of offenders while failing to significantly reduce the use of illicit drugs. This course examines drug use in a historical context while addressing the changing nature and dimension of drug use, including the pharmacology of drugs, patterns of drug use, and sentencing policies. Because drug control is inextricably linked to social, political, and public policy, the course will provide the student with a foundation for critical thinking and rational decision making relative to the efficacy of the various drug control initiatives. Since drugs seemingly permeate every level of American society and directly or tangentially touch most Americans’ lives, issues such as drug testing in the workplace, the use of drug courier profiles, legalized medical marijuana, and needle exchange programs are evaluated. Students will be expected to learn the pharmacology of various drugs, the history of drug use in the United States since the colonial era, the evolution of federal drug agencies, and acquire knowledge about contemporary drug issues. They also will be expected to develop and strengthen their critical thinking skills as they assess the consequences of implementing particular anti-drug policies and their impact on reducing the use of illicit drug use. An example of the evaluation methods would be: students will be evaluated on the basis of three exams and four “think pieces” (requiring students’ critical responses to an assigned topic) scheduled throughout the semester. Class attendance also will influence the grade. Faculty Member Proposing Course : John C. McWilliams

EXPCL 901: Children’s Advocacy Clinic

  • Department: Dickinson Law
  • Credits: 4
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The course will provide instruction to students in the legal representation of children in various civil matters, including dependency, adoption and custody actions. Students will be managing a caseload of clients. Students will meet directly with their clients, and correspond with agencies and opposing counsel. Students will appear at all court appearances with a supervising attorney. The supervising attorney will meet with students individually on a regular basis for case reviews. The classroom component of the course will focus on various substantive and skills issues, including lectures on child interviewing skills and lectures from physicians on the medical aspects of child abuse.

FRNSC 532: Drug Chemistry and Toxicology

  • College: Eberly College of Science
  • Department: Forensic Science
  • Credits: 3
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Chemical and toxicological properties of therapeutic and non-therapeutic drugs and the analytical and instrumental methods of their identification and quantification.

HDFS 597: Special Topics (Substance Abuse)

  • College: College of Health and Human Development
  • Department: Human Development and Family Studies
  • Credits: 3
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This graduate seminar will cover a wide range of issues pertaining to substance abuse, including tobacco and alcohol, as well as illicit and misused prescription drugs. The course is based on a transdisciplinary, developmental model which considers the multitude of individual characteristics in interaction with psychosocial conditions and experiences throughout childhood and adolescence that increase propensity to misuse substances. This basic knowledge will then be discussed in the context of prevailing interventions and the potential for more precision-based strategies that map onto what we know about the etiological underpinnings of substance use behaviors. To round out the translational model, we will address the need for evidence-based strategies to be implemented, disseminated and scaled more systematically, and ways in which this scientific understanding of the risk and resiliency factors has potential to reform public and mental health policies. Students will be required to select a risk factor (or set of factors) for substance abuse (social, neurobiological, psychological, environmental or a combination) that they seek to remedy or attenuate and propose the development of a novel intervention that stems from our basic science knowledge. The paper will also discuss the potential for translation of accumulated knowledge to inform policy and educate the public regarding the particular topic chosen.

HLHED 443: Alcohol and Drug Education

  • College: Penn State Harrisburg
  • Department: School of Behavioral Sciences and Education
  • Credits: 3
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Principles of integration and coordination of alcohol and drug education programs for health education and other social service professions.

KINES 321: Psychology of Movement Behavior

  • College: College of Health and Human Development
  • Department: Department of Kinesiology
  • Credits: 3
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Psychology of Movement Behavior is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts and applications of psychological knowledge for organized sport, physical activity, athletic training, and related environments where people are active. The course touches on the history of sport and exercise psychology, sport and exercise psychology consultants’ responsibilities (i.e., research, teaching, and service), and understanding sport and exercise participants’ personality traits and motivation for participation. The course also promotes an understanding of sport and exercise environments through discussion of competition, group dynamics, and the principles of feedback and reinforcement. Performance enhancement is also covered through discussion of topics related to psychological skills training and application (e.g., goal setting, imagery, and relaxation training). Finally, the course focuses on enhancing sport and exercise participants’ health and well-¬being by promoting an understanding of addictive behaviors (e.g., exercise dependence, eating disorders, and substance dependence), body image, injury rehabilitation, and exercise initiation, maintenance, and adherence. The general objective of this course is to familiarize the student with the science and practice of sport and exercise psychology from both a theoretical and applied perspective. To achieve this objective, the student will: (a) develop an understanding of how various psychological factors influence athletic performance, physical activity participation, and overall health and well¬-being; (b) learn the methods used by athletes and exercisers of various skill levels to achieve peak performance; (c) understand the scientific and theoretical background of sport and exercise participation; and (d) comprehend how psychological skills are applied to sport and exercise environments to enhance peak performance and quality of life, and recognize the ethical principles of applying these psychological skills

KINES 445: Alcohol and Drug Education

  • College: College of Health and Human Development
  • Department: Department of Kinesiology
  • Credits: 3
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Principles of integration and coordination of alcohol and drug education programs for health education and other health related professions.

NURS 407: Drugs of Abuse and Mental Health Issues

  • College: College of Nursing
  • Credits: 3
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Examines the issue of substance abuse in today’s society. It looks closely into the health care needs across the lifespan of clients who have an alcohol or other drug disorder in combination with a psychiatric disorder. Pharmacological, behavioral, biological, and sociocultural characteristics, along with factors and patterns of addiction, are discussed and then how these factors and characteristics relate to mental illnesses are further explored. The different classes of habit-forming drugs (alcohol, stimulants, marijuana, hallucinogens, inhalants and prescription drugs) are covered and various treatment options are examined.

NURS 462: Psychotropic Drugs and Children/Adolescents

  • College: College of Nursing
  • Credits: 1
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Study of psychotropic medications used to treat children and adolescents, including indications, actions, adverse reactions and implications for school nurses. The major drug classifications of psychotropic drugs including stimulants, selective norephinephrine reuptake inhibitors, antidepressants, antipsychotics, alpha 2 Adrenergic Agents, antianxiety agents, lithium and antiepileptic agents will be reviewed. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to explain the mechanism of action of the major psychotropic drug classes; list the indications for the use of psychotropic drugs in children and adolescents; recognize the possible adverse reactions that may occur in children/adolescents who are taking psychotropic drugs; and explain the role of the school nurse in monitoring the effectiveness and side effects of psychotropic drugs.Teaching strategies may include lecture discussion, audiovisuals, selected readings. This course may be offered in the Spring, Summer or Fall semesters.

PAS 704: Clinical Medicine I

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This is the cornerstone of all the medically relevant courses. Various disease processes will be described, along with the incidence, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment plans, and expected outcomes.

PAS 705 & 706: Clinical Medicine II & III

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This is the cornerstone of all the medically relevant courses. Various disease processes will be described, along with the incidence, prevalence, underlying causes, treatment plans, and expected outcomes. This course is organized into blocks covering infectious disease, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, rheumatology, general surgery, and musculoskeletal disease.

Grand Round presentations at the Hershey Medical Center may be used to supplement the topics in this class and will be assigned, as needed. The typical presentation for these disorders will bediscussed along with a wide spectrum of the disease entity. With the integrated approach to this curriculum, deep discussion regarding the prevalence, signs and symptoms, initial evaluation strategies and clinical interventional; strategies will be discussed. Team-Based Learning and Critical Thinking Skill Development/Patient Communication discussion will be held throughout the semester in order to will support and reinforce the information provided in this class. This course is held during the second pre-clinical semester for students in the physician assistant program. Active learning strategies will be employed in order to keep the student actively engaged in this educational process. Reflective thinking exercises will be utilized in order for the student to gain critical thinking skills in order to apply this knowledge to the clinical setting. At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able to identify, assess, evaluate, and provide clinical interventional strategies for patients who present with complaints related to the following systems: infectious disease, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, rheumatology, general surgery, and musculoskeletal disease. Students successfully completing this course will also be able to demonstrate their interpersonal communication skills to their patients with regard to patient education for preventive and acute care strategies and for ongoing support for patients with chronic disease states.

PAS 707: Pathophysiology I

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This class provides a systems approach to basic concepts of disease processes which enables analysis for alterations to body systems.

PAS 708 & 709: Pathophysiology II & III

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This course provides a systems approach to basic concepts of disease processes which enables analysis for alterations to body systems. Normal physiology will be discussed as part of the class but class emphasis is in the area of pathophysiology. Concepts are reviewed for the understanding that disease processes represent a disruption in homeostasis and a breakdown of normal integration of structure and function. Pathology regarding the following systems will be presented: infectious disease, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, rheumatology, general surgery, and musculoskeletal disease. Special emphasis will be placed upon normal physiology and pathophysiologic processes that affect specific population subtypes. This is the cornerstone of all physiology and pathophysiology instruction utilized in the curriculum. Various disease processes will be described with discussion as to the underlying causes. Normal physiology will be discussed so that the learner can better grasp the outcomes of processes when normal physiology breaks down. This course is organized into blocks covering: infectious disease, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, rheumatology, general surgery, and musculoskeletal disease. This course will be presented concurrently with physiology, pharmacology, and the clinical medicine approach to the course topics, as seen from the clinician’s perspective. This integrative approach covering multiple elements of each of the conditions allows the student to gain an inclusive perspective to all of the covered entities. Other elements of the curriculum during this semester will be separately presented during the semester and these other courses will further support and enhance the topics covered in these sections. Instructional Objectives: At the conclusion of this course the student will: Demonstrate the ability to formulate differential diagnosis and evaluation methods for patients who present with alterations in the normal physiologic processes for the following systems: infectious disease, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, rheumatology, general surgery, and musculoskeletal disease, Develop a plan for patients who present with complaints in the following systems: infectious disease, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, rheumatology, general surgery, and musculoskeletal disease, Describe the presentation, key findings, and underlying causes of both physiology and pathophysiology infectious disease, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, rheumatology, general surgery, and musculoskeletal disease, Explain the importance and role of diagnostic interventions that are used for patients who present with diseases related to the following systems: infectious disease, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, rheumatology, general surgery, and musculoskeletal disease with the understanding of both normal and abnormal physiological processes, Explain the underlying processes for the various diseases that are covered in the areas of infectious disease, neurology, dermatology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, rheumatology, general surgery, and musculoskeletal disease.

PAS 710: Pharmacology I

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This class reviews the basic principles of drug action, their indications, contraindications, toxicities, and potential side effects.

PAS 711 & 712: Pharmacology II & III

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This class provides instruction in the basic principles of drug action, drug indications, drug interaction, toxicities, and adverse drug effects, as taught from the perspective of the clinician prescriber. Students will be able to study the commonly used drugs affecting infectious disease, dermatologic disease, neurologic condition, rheumatologic condition, ophthalmologic condition, otolaryngolic condition, oral cavity, and musculoskeletal condition. Indications for using first and second-line medications will be emphasized in this course along with the exclusions for using these medications in specific circumstances. Special emphasis is placed upon the use of medications in special populations (pregnancy, pediatric, geriatric) and how these conditions can affect drug metabolism. This is the cornerstone of pharmacology instruction in the curriculum. Various disease processes will be described along with pharmacologic management. This course is organized into blocks covering affecting infectious disease, dermatologic disease, neurologic condition, rheumatologic condition, ophthalmologic condition, otolaryngolic condition, oral cavity, and musculoskeletal conditions. This course is presented concurrently with physiology, pathophysiology, and the clinical medicine approach to the course topics, as seen from the prescriber’s perspective. This integrative approach covers multiple perspectives for each of the conditions allowing the student to gain an overall perspective to these covered entities. Other elements of the curriculum will be separately presented during the semester and these other courses will further support and enhance the topics covered in these sections.

Instructional Objectives: At the conclusion of this course the student will be able to: Demonstrate the ability to develop a tiered treatment regimen for conditions relating to the affecting infectious disease, dermatologic disease, neurologic condition, rheumatologic condition, ophthalmologic condition, otolaryngolic condition, oral cavity, and musculoskeletal condition, Describe the presentation, key findings, and underlying causes of both normal and abnormal disease processes in affecting infectious disease, dermatologic disease, neurologic condition, rheumatologic condition, ophthalmologic condition, otolaryngolic condition, oral cavity, and musculoskeletal condition which will entail personalized medicine and treatment plans, Explain the importance and role of diagnostic interventions that are used for patients who present with diseases related to the affecting infectious disease, dermatologic disease, neurologic condition, rheumatologic condition, ophthalmologic condition, otolaryngolic condition, oral cavity, and musculoskeletal condition, Explain the underlying processes for the various diseases regarding the affecting infectious disease, dermatologic disease, neurologic condition, rheumatologic condition, ophthalmologic condition, otolaryngolic condition, oral cavity, and musculoskeletal condition so that individual clinical therapeutic plans can be developed. Evaluation Methods: Traditional assessment methods will be utilized in this course (multiple choice, best-answer examinations). The learning goals of this class necessitate that core knowledge is assessed along with the student’s ability to develop treatment regimen based upon clinical case scenario. This class will provide relevant, authentic case discussion for problems involving the gastroenterologic, renal/urologic,
endocrine, and immune systems along with geriatric medicine.

PAS 713: Pharmacotherapeutics I

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This course discusses the mechanism of action, medication classification, the indications, contraindications, and adverse events seen with medication use.

PAS 714: Pharmacotherapeutics II

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This course will discuss the mechanism of action, the classification system for medications, the indications, contraindications, and side effects with the use of medications in various systems. This course will discuss the various methods by which medications can be utilized and will highlight and explain why certain medications are considered to be the drug of choice for a given problem.

Alternatives to medications may also be discussed in the management of various conditions. This course will also discuss costs of medications so that the graduate physician assistant student is taught pharmacotherapeutics from a cost-effective perspective. The subjects that will be emphasized during this course will be infectious disease, HEENT, neurology, rheumatology, behavioral medicine, and musculoskeletal medicine.

PAS 715: Pharmacotherapeutics III

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This course will discuss the mechanism of action, the classification system for medications, the indications, contraindications, and side effects with the use of medications in various systems. This course will discuss the various methods by which medications can be utilized and will highlight and explain why certain medications are considered to be the drug of choice for a given problem.

Alternatives to medications may also be discussed in the management of various conditions. This course will also discuss costs of medications so that the graduate physician assistant student is taught pharmacotherapeutics from a cost-effective perspective. This course will emphasize topic areas in the following systems: cardiac, pulmonary, hematologic, and oncologic systems.

PAS 719: Evidence-Based Medicine

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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Evidence-based Medicine (PAS719) is a mandatory 14 week course given during the first year of the curriculum consisting of 14 two hour sessions. The course will be held on Fridays from 1-3 pm during the fall semester. Multiple learning environments will be utilized including didactic sessions, TBL, small group learning and standardized patient exercises. Students will be taught relevant statistics, how to utilize the medical literature, formulation of PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison and Outcomes) questions and, most importantly, application of their knowledge at the point of care for patient care. Course faculty will be multi-disciplinary and include physicians and library staff who have taught such courses in the College of Medicine to medical students for a number of years. This course is intended to instruct the physician assistant student in how to find and interpret the medical literature. As a result of this course, students will be able to frame the clinical question, perform literature searches at the point of care, and be able to guide patients into making informed choices about their care based upon medical evidence. As a result of this course, students will be able to search for information regarding best practice of care and students will gain the ability to sift through what various clinical trials mean for translational medicine. Students will be provided opportunities to perform point of care evidence searches at the point of care during this class so that this skill can be translated to their clinical experiences as both a student in the clinical phase of the PA program and also as practicing physician assistants. Assessment methods will include practical experience in searching the medical literature, exercises with standardized patients with developing the clinical question and applying evidence-based medicine point of care techniques. Students will be detailed on the standards for passing this course on the course syllabi. Grading for this course will be from the instructors and peers taking this course. This course is a required course for physician assistant education, as determined by the national accrediting agency for physician assistants. Learning outcomes for each of the teaching sessions will be provided to the student electronically through the academic management system such as Angel.

PAS 721: US Health Care System/Legal Medicine

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This course is intended to introduce the graduate physician assistant to the health care delivery system in the United States with reference to how the physician assistant profession fits into this system for providing accessible, comprehensive, and cost-effective care. This course will also cover the legal aspect involved with medical practice.

PAS 723: Behavioral Medicine

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This course will instruct the student in the practice of behavioral medicine. The program will provide instruction in order for the student to identify normal and abnormal behavior patterns along with the psychological and pharmacological treatment modalities that are required to evaluate and treat these conditions.

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to determine normal and abnormal psychological syndromes and will be able to perform a clinical exam on a psychiatric patient. The student will be able to utilize the DSM-V manual. The student will gain expertise in many psychiatric syndromes, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, dissociative disorders, eating disorders, and disorders affecting children.

The emphasis of this course will be on interviewing techniques that are performed at the patient bedside. Students will be able to demonstrate appropriate listening, asking appropriate open-ended and probing questions, and demonstrate the ability to obtain the appropriate material for developing a differential diagnosis. After the diagnosis is narrowed down, the student will appropriately develop a treatment plan that may include the use of psychotropic medications

PAS 730: Medical Ethics

  • College: College of Medicine
  • Department: Physician Assistant Studies
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This course aims to introduce students to a variety of ethical problems that arise in the practice of medicine. This course will also introduce ethics methods—in other words, how do you do ethics in a systematic fashion that will increase the probability of arriving at right answers. The goal is to apply a systematic framework to ethical dilemmas in order to de-mystify the process and empower students to reach their own right answers.

At the conclusion of the course, student will be able to:

  • Recognize common ethical issues they are likely to face, and consider the issue within the larger context of a moral method Demonstrate an ability to anticipate and avoid ethical problems
  • Resolve ethical dilemmas using moral methods

This course aims to accomplish four primary goals. First, I want to begin to improve your critical thinking skills. This is partly accomplished by assigning readings that address various topics and issues that are relevant and then engaging them in directed classroom discussion of those readings and subjects. Second, through class discussion I want to expose and familiarize you with an interactive Socratic style of classroom activity in which the goal is shared exploration of the topics rather than a passive lecture-•style classroom. Along with improving critical thinking, this allows us to practice and improve our ability to articulate, discuss and debate ideas aloud (i.e., interpersonal and team interaction skills). Third, you will become more familiar with some of the basic concepts, issues, arguments and cases in medical ethics.

VBSC 451: Immunotoxicology of Drugs and Chemicals

  • College: College of Agricultural Sciences
  • Department: Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
  • Credits: 3
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An in depth discussion of the effect of xenobiotics and drugs on host immune mechanisms. Maintaining good health is a priority for most of us, and a key element in staying healthy is a properly functioning immune system. However, we are constantly exposed to a barrage of chemicals in the environment both natural and man-made.

Some of the key questions asked included:

  1. do environmental chemicals affect the generation of immunity?,
  2. is our environment to blame for bad health? , and
  3. can natural compounds cause immunotoxicity?

These questions and more will be addressed in Immunotoxicology. This course will focus primarily on the effects of chemicals in the environment but will also cover the impact of other factors such as therapeutics, recreational drugs, and dietary factors on the immune system. Immunomodulatory mechanisms will be examined at systemic, cellular and molecular levels. Discussions will include theory, principles, and methodology and key issues in immunotoxicity, host immune mechanisms, and tumorigenesis. Key issues in regulatory immunotoxicology will be discussed to make students prepared for jobs in Federal Regulatory Agencies. Grading for undergraduates will include midterm and finals, and class participation; while graduate students will be required to also write a short, immunotoxicologically-related research proposal. Our intent is to provide a bridge between the two sciences and the undergraduate majors of Immunology and Toxicology, with an introduction to the basic mechanisms by which environmental, occupational, and therapeutic agents may interfere with immunologic systems. Immunotoxicology is offered every fall semester and is designed for undergraduate students from toxicology, immunology, and forensic science majors.