Consortium to Combat Substance Abuse Seed Funding

Proposals are invited for pilot research projects aimed at combating substance abuse. We seek interdisciplinary Penn State teams to develop novel translational research programs, from discovery-oriented research to dissemination and implementation science.

We are interested in applications that

  • build collaborations involving new interdisciplinary teams whose research is aimed at attracting external funding;
  • develop collaborations that involve junior and senior faculty (associate professors can serve in either role depending on their experiences) and cross-campus team members;
  • propose novel research, including high-risk, high-reward and transformative, proof of concept projects that provide preliminary data necessary for external funding.

Priority will be given to projects that make a convincing case for how the research can advance solutions to the systemic problems of substance abuse. In line with Penn State’s new Consortium to Combat Substance Abuse, applications are particularly encouraged that map onto the University’s distinctive strengths in substance abuse research: pathways to addiction, criminal justice, and spillover effects to children, families, and communities. Projects that build strength in impact analysis or implementation and dissemination science also are encouraged. Proposals may focus on any substance of abuse, including alcohol, nicotine, cannabis, prescription drug misuse, and other illicit drug use.

Read the Request for Applications from the Penn State Social Science Research Institute (SSRI). At least $100,000 of funding is available through this seed grant solicitation via the SSRI’s Level 1 and Level 2 mechanisms. Level 1 applications can be submitted at any time. Letters of intent (LOI) to submit a Level 2 application are required and are due on January 15, 2019.

 

Opioid Seed Grants

Through its seed grant program, the Consortium to Combat Substance Abuse is motivating new research aimed at combating substance abuse. To date, 10 new interdisciplinary teams have been funded. Teams include faculty members from 9 colleges and 3 campuses.

Pathways to Addiction: Prevention and Treatment

“Alexa, I’m in pain!” A Real-Time Mindfulness Intervention to Control Pain: Delivery Through a Conversational Agent – Saeed Abdullah, College of Information Sciences and Technology; Stephanie Lanza, College of Health and Human Development; Sebrina Doyle, College of Health and Human Development; Robert Roeser, College of Health and Human Development; and David Almeida , College of Health and Human Development.

Neural Mediators and Moderators of Mindful Yoga Practice in Opiate-Dependent Individuals –  Emma Rose, College of Health and Human Development; Diana H. Fishbein, College of Health and Human Development; Robert W. Roeser, College of Health and Human Development; Scott Bunce, College of Medicine; and Sarah Bowen, Pacific University – Oregon.

The Influence of Adolescent Social Stress on Morphine Behaviors – Helen Kamens, College of Health and Human Development; Sonia Cavigelli, College of Health and Human Development; and Patricia Sue Grigson, College of Medicine.

PROSPER PLUS: Combining Effective Prevention Education with Supply Side Interventions to Reduce Opioid Misuse – Janet Welsh, College of Health and Human Development; Daniel Perkins, College of Agricultural Sciences; Derek Kreager, College of the Liberal Arts; and Glenn Sterner, Penn State Abington.

Criminal Justice

Linking Accidental Overdoses to Medical Professionals and Pharmacies: A Population-Based Social Network Analysis – Glenn Sterner, Penn State Abington; Oren M. Gur, Penn State Abington; and Sabahattin Gokhan Ozden, Penn State Abington.

Spillover Effects to Children, Families, and Communities

Opioid Prescription Practices and Risk Factors for Persistent Use After Childbirth – Danielle Downs, College of Health and Human Development; Lisa Bailey-Davis, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine; Tammy Corr, College of Medicine; Timothy Deimling, College of Medicine; Richard Legro, College of Medicine; Dhanya Mackeen, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine; Jaimey Pauli, College of Medicine; and Mark Stephens, College of Medicine.

Perinatal Opioid Use and Maternal Nutrition and Health Status – Emily Hohman, College of Health and Human Development; Sarah Kawasaki, College of Medicine; Tammy Corr, College of Medicine; Jennifer Savage Williams, College of Health and Human Development; and Danielle Symons Downs, College of Health and Human Development.

Using Integrated Databases to Examine Patient Outcomes in Children with a History of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome – Tammy Corr, College of Medicine; Max Crowley, College of Health and Human Development; Douglas L. Leslie, College of Medicine; Jeffrey R. Kaiser, College of Medicine; Paul L. Morgan, College of Education; and Guodong Liu, College of Medicine.

Impact Analysis

Predicting Spatial-Temporal Patterns of Opioid Use with Criminal and Overdose Data in Pennsylvania – Qiushi Chen, College of Engineering; Conrad S. Tucker, College of Engineering; Glenn Sterner, Penn State Abington; and Joel Segel, College of Health and Human Development.

An Innovative Approach to Tackle the Opioid Epidemic: Utilizing Twitter Data and Integrating Big Data Analytics and Spatial and Social Network Analyses – Zhen Lei, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences; Guangqing Chi; College of Agricultural Sciences; Cynthia Chuang, College of Medicine; Glenn Sterner, Penn State Abington; Ashton Verdery, College of the Liberal Arts; and Junjun Yin, Social Science Research Institute.

 

Community Fellows Program

The Community Fellows Program, a funding mechanism of Penn State’s Consortium to Combat Substance Abuse and the Social Science Research Institute, provides support for faculty seeking to develop university-community collaborations that address substance abuse and its spillover effects to families and communities. These collaborations should be aimed at building sustainable, evidence-based or evidence-informed programs, policies and/or practices that can effectively address substance misuse/abuse issues within a targeted community.